Game Research, Publications, and Conference Presentations

Kayler, M. (2017). It’s Not About The Game, It’s About the Pedagogy. Gotland Game Conference and Educators Summit, Uppsala University, Gotland Campus, Visby, Sweden.

Kayler, M., Eichenberger, E., Melnychenko, L., Staier, C., Preas, B. & Clegg, A. (2017). Unlock the mysteries of Highland Haunting. Domains 2017 Conference, Oklahoma State University, Oklahoma.

Kayler, M. (2015). ‘Gaming faculty development and ‘quoting’ for student engagement in computer science courses. Society for Information Technology and Teaching Education International Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada.

Kayler, M. (2105). Got Game? A Case Study for ‘Gaming’ Faculty development. The Teaching Professor Conference, Atlanta, Georgia.

Kayler, M. & Ames, L. (March, 2015). Game-based Curriculum Design Workshop. University of Mary Washington EdTech College of Education, University of Mary Washington, Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Toth, D. & Kayler, M. (2015). Integrating role-playing games into computer science courses as a pedagogical tool. Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education Conference Proceedings. Proceedings of the 46th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education.

Kayler, M. & Ames, L. (2014). Don Ye Cap for a Hero’s Quest with Gaming. InstructureCon, Crystal City, Utah.

Kayler, M. & Ames, L. (November, 2014). Beyond ‘Banking’ to ‘Bartle’ – Faculty Development Gets Game! Instructure Webinar. 

Kayler, M. & Toth, D. (2014). Integrating role-playing games into computer science courses as a pedagogical tool. Lilly Conference, Bethesda, Maryland.

Sprague, D. & Kayler, M. (2011). Fear, Apprehension, Stereotypes, Oh MY! Exploring Teachers’ Reactions to Virtual Gaming. In M.Koehler & P. Mishra (EDS.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 (pp.2248-2253). Chesapeake, VA: AACE.

Kayler, M. & Sprague, D. (April, 2011). “You Want Us to Do What? K-12 teachers’ experiences in virtual gaming environments. American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Kayler, M. & Sprague, D. (March, 2011). “Fear, Stereotypes, Apprehension, Oh My! K-12 teachers’ perceptions and experiences with virtual gaming. Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education International Conference, Nashville, Tennessee.

Kayler, M., Sprague, D., & Dede, C. (2009). Online gaming: Building bridges that enhance cultural understandings. In C. Vrasidas, M. Zembylas & G. Glass, ICT for Education, Development & Social Justice (pp.183-200). North Carolina, Information Age Publishing.

Sprague, D. & Kayler, M., & Bohnstedt, K. (2009). Gaming and social causes: A marriage whose time has come. National Educational Computing  Conference, Washington, D.C.

Kayler, M. (2009). Structures and processes that matter to players in virtual gaming environments. Entertainment Arts (EA Games), San Francisco, California (February, 2009).

Kayler, M., Sprague, D. & Chris, D. (2008). Online Gaming: Processes, Structures and Cultural Understandings. In J. Luca & E. Weippl (Eds.), Proceedings of World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2008 (pp. 1067-1074). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. Retrieved February 4, 2014 from http://www.editlib.org/p/28523.

Kayler, M., Sprague, D., & Dede, C. (2008). Online gaming: Processes, structures and cultural understandings. The ED-Media 2008 World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications, Vienna, Austria.

Kayler, M., & Sprague, D. (2008). Online gaming: Bridging cultural understandings. 4th Annual Innovations in e-Learning Symposium, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia.